Stealthyx Therapeutics and Cancer Research Technology announce co-development partnership for tumour-targeted therapy

Cancer Research Technology (CRT), the specialist oncology development and commercialisation company, and Stealthyx Therapeutics, the disease targeting drug company spin out of Queen Mary, University of London have entered into an agreement to co-develop Stealthyx’s proprietary drug delivery platform, Prothyx.

The Prothyx platform adds extra functionality to therapeutic molecules making them preferentially active at sites of disease. Localising a drug’s activity only to the diseased tissue promises to minimise adverse side effects on other tissues and may enable higher doses of drugs to be given less frequently.

Under the terms of the agreement, CRT has obtained worldwide exclusive rights to develop and commercialise the Prothyx platform within the field of oncology and will perform in-house development of candidate Prothyx-based anti-cancer therapies. Stealthyx will exploit developments arising from the program in other therapeutic areas including rheumatoid arthritis.

Phil L’Huillier, Director of Business Management at CRT, said “In-licensing of promising technologies from commercial parties to accelerate the development of novel cancer therapies highlights our continued commitment to the realisation of cancer patient benefit.”

Professor Yuti Chernajovsky, Founder of Stealthyx Therapeutics and ARC Chair of Rheumatology at Queen Mary, University of London, said “CRT’s co-development support for Prothyx endorses the important potential of our technology in cancer, where there are great opportunities to improve patients’ clinical outcomes, and minimise the distressing side effects of some cancer treatments. I look forward to working with our partners to help bring safer medicines to the market.”

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