NYU Medical Center partners with Rosetta Genomics to tackle mesothelioma

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Rosetta Genomics, Ltd has announced that it has partnered with NYU Medical Center with the aim of developing a line of early detection diagnostic products for lung, and Mesothelioma cancers.

The early detection test will mainly target over 45 million Americans who are at an increased risk of lung cancer due to smoking, as well as those who have been exposed to asbestos fibers. The test will utilize Rosetta Genomics' proprietary protocol to extract microRNAs from a simple blood draw.

"A test that will be able to detect cancer at an early stage using a simple blood draw will have far reaching implications on the fight against cancer," noted Dr. Harvey Pass, Professor and Chief, Division of Thoracic Surgery and Thoracic Oncology at NYU Medical Center. "MicroRNAs have been shown to hold great potential as effective biomarkers for various cancers, and I believe that NYU Medical Center's vast experience with lung cancer and Mesothelioma, coupled with Rosetta Genomics' expertise in the microRNA field, will allow us to successfully advance this much needed test forward."

Mesothelioma is a form of cancer that is almost always caused by previous exposure to asbestos. In this disease, malignant cells develop in the mesothelium, a protective lining that covers most of the body's internal organs. Most people who develop mesothelioma have worked on jobs where they inhaled asbestos particles, or have been exposed to high levels of asbestos fibers.

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