FASgen announces new diagnostic test for steatohepititis

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FASgen Inc. announced it has successfully expanded the potential use for its serum FAS (fatty acid synthase) ELISA diagnostic research test, FAS-Detect ELISA for the identification of Non-Alcoholic Steatophepititis (NASH).

The current diagnostic technique for this disease is a liver needle biopsy. While only for research use presently, FASgen anticipates the opportunity for use of the non-invasive FAS-Detect ELISA NASH test in the future will be substantial. FAS-Detect ELISA is a proprietary product of FASgen Diagnostics LLC, an affiliated FASgen company.

NASH commonly occurs as the result of fatty liver disease. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now rather common among the obese population, with an estimated 25 million adults harboring NAFLD, with up to 5% of these patients developing NASH. A significant number of NASH patients go on to develop potentially fatal cirrhosis.

These discoveries by FASgen are part of the Company's extensive work in developing therapeutic products to treat obesity by the selective inhibition of FAS and related targets. Identifying patients with NASH in the future using the FAS-Detect ELISA serum test could select those patients at risk for serious liver disease and those most likely to benefit from proactive therapy.

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