Ferring Pharmaceuticals launches new trial of Degarelix for intermittent androgen deprivation therapy

NewsGuard 100/100 Score

Ferring Pharmaceuticals has announced the launch of a Phase IIIB clinical trial of degarelix for injection, a new injectable gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonist approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of hormone sensitive advanced prostate cancer.

The announcement was made at the 2009 American Urological Association Annual Meeting in Chicago, IL.

The Phase IIIB trial will investigate the use of degarelix for intermittent androgen deprivation therapy (IADT) in patients with advanced prostate cancer who have rising serum PSA levels after previous curative therapies. The study will compare IADT to continuous androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for 14 months with either leuprolide or degarelix. The trial evaluates whether IADT minimizes the negative effects of ADT and maximizes quality of life, while maintaining tumor response as measured by PSA suppression.

"Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy is a commonly employed treatment for men with biochemical failure, however it needs to be evaluated in a randomized clinical trial," says Dr. E. David Crawford, Head Urologic Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver and a trial investigator. "There is potential value in combining the rapid, sustained suppression of testosterone that degarelix offers in this treatment. IADT appears to improve patient quality of life and that will also be evaluated."

Physicians interested in serving as trial investigators should call 1-973-796-1600 to speak with Ferring Pharmaceuticals' Medical Information office.

Degarelix Phase III Trials

Phase III pivotal studies showed that degarelix is as effective as leuprolide (Lupron Depot(R))(*)in reducing and sustaining castrate levels of testosterone.(1)(2) Suppression of testosterone to castrate levels occurred significantly faster in patients receiving degarelix than in those receiving leuprolide.(1)(2) At Day 3 of treatment, the degarelix group achieved a 90 percent decrease in median testosterone levels compared with the leuprolide group, which experienced a 65 percent increase in median testosterone levels, a statistically significant result. Degarelix was as effective as leuprolide in suppressing testosterone levels from Day 28 to the end of the study (Day 364), with 97.2 percent of the degarelix patients maintaining medical castrate levels compared with 96.4 percent for leuprolide.

In addition, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were lowered by 64 percent two weeks after administration of degarelix, 85 percent after one month, 95 percent after three months, and remained suppressed throughout the one year of treatment.(1)(2) These PSA results should be interpreted with caution because of the heterogeneity of the patient population studied. No evidence has shown that the rapidity of PSA decline is related to a clinical benefit.

About Degarelix

Degarelix is an injectable gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonist approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of hormone sensitive advanced prostate cancer. As a receptor antagonist, degarelix reversibly binds to the GnRH receptors in the pituitary gland, immediately suppressing the secretion of the luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and subsequently, testosterone levels.(3) Degarelix also reduces levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Unlike luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists, such as leuprolide, an established treatment for prostate cancer, degarelix does not induce an initial testosterone surge. Degarelix is administered monthly by subcutaneous injection. The starting dose is 240 mg, followed by monthly maintenance doses of 80 mg. Degarelix is available for order through traditional and specialty pharmacy distributors. The average monthly cost of one year of degarelix treatment is comparable to other hormone treatments for prostate cancer.

The most commonly observed adverse reactions during degarelix therapy included injection site reactions (e.g. pain, erythema, swelling or induration), hot flashes, increased weight, fatigue, and increases in serum levels of transaminases and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT). Ninety-nine percent of these observed adverse reactions were Grade 1 or 2 (mild to moderate). Specifically relating to the injection site adverse reactions, most were transient, of mild to moderate intensity, occurred primarily with the starting dose and led to few discontinuations (<1%). Grade 3 (severe) injection site reactions occurred in two percent or less of patients receiving degarelix.

Degarelix is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to degarelix or to any of the product components. Degarelix is not indicated in women or pediatric patients. Long-term androgen deprivation therapy prolongs the QT interval. Physicians should consider whether the benefits of androgen deprivation therapy outweigh the potential risks in patients with congenital long QT syndrome, electrolyte abnormalities, or congestive heart failure and in patients taking Class IA (e.g. quinidine, procainamide) or Class III (e.g. amiodarone, sotalol) antiarrhythmic medications.

Comments

  1. Robert Leone Robert Leone United States says:

    I am about to begin the degarelix phase III trial.  All that I have read on the drug tells me a lot about the side affects.  I do not see any evidents written to a layman that tells of the benefits so far given in these trials, can anyone help me with this.  Please!
    Sincerely yours

    Robert Leone

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
Post a new comment
Post

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.

You might also like...
Androgen receptor signaling found to upregulate gene driving melanoma severity in men