Resverlogix files two patents on compounds for inflammatory diseases

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Resverlogix Corp. has announced today that it has made significant advancement in the Company's research and development (R&D) program for inflammatory diseases.

Two new patent applications have been filed for novel compounds and their use in regulating inflammatory markers. Inflammatory markers are proteins generated by the body during periods of inflammation. These patents were filed based on the successful results demonstrated in numerous preclinical studies across several disease areas. The particular results achieved in the collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model in rats demonstrated that Resverlogix's proprietary molecules markedly reduced inflammation while improving mobility of arthritic animals.

"Resverlogix's R&D program has made significant strides this past year," said Donald J. McCaffrey, President & CEO of Resverlogix. "The Company has identified several molecules that have the potential for disease modifying effects in inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis. Resverlogix's R&D team is continuing to examine the various disease indications in inflammation which would have the greatest potential impact for both patients and payer groups," continued McCaffrey.

A significant unmet medical need exists for safe, effective and economical therapies for specific inflammation markets. For example, a small molecular drug for rheumatoid arthritis is estimated to range in price from US $180 - US $6000 per person per annum. A biologic, or large molecule drug, can cost in the order of US $13,000 - US $30,000 per patient per annum. In 2007, the global market for rheumatoid arthritis alone was estimated to be in excess of US $11 billion a year and is expected to grow to US $27 billion by the year 2015. These important markets require novel therapies to reduce pain and symptoms in a cost efficient manner. Resverlogix's novel small molecules have the illustrated early potential to fill this important gap.

Kenneth Lebioda, Senior Vice President of Business & Corporate Development of Resverlogix stated, "The inflammation market is enormous with many significant unmet needs. Current leading therapeutics such as biologics are effective, but also very expensive. Resverlogix's platform technology has created novel small molecules which illustrate potent anti-inflammatory effects in arthritis models as compared with leading biologic agents." Lebioda highlighted, "The early efficacy data from these compounds is exciting for the reason that small molecules would offer significant cost savings to health systems over current biologic agents."

Inflammation is a normal response of the body to protect tissues from infection, injury or disease. Though it promotes healing, if uncontrolled, the inflammatory response may become harmful. Acute or chronic inflammation is known to play a key role in diverse disease states, such as atherosclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Worldwide it is estimated that more than 80 million people suffer from inflammatory diseases.

Resverlogix will be presenting at the BIO Business Forum held at the Convention Center in Atlanta, Georgia on Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 9:20 am EDT in Room 313.

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