Hospira launches generic version of Sanofi-Aventis' Eloxatin

Hospira, Inc. (NYSE: HSP) today announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval and launch of oxaliplatin injection in the United States.

The medication is a generic version of Sanofi-Aventis' Eloxatin(R), which posted 2008 U.S. sales of approximately $1.4 billion. Hospira's oxaliplatin injection is one of the first generic versions of this drug to come in solution form. The innovator drug is also in solution form. Oxaliplatin injection, used in combination with infusional 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin, is indicated for adjuvant treatment of Stage III colon cancer in patients who have undergone complete resection of the primary tumor, and in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer.

"Hospira's launch of oxaliplatin injection in solution form gives our customers a generic alternative of this critical medication in the formulation they seek," said Sue Hazelwood, vice president and general manager, alternate site, U.S., Hospira. "This is another example of Hospira's dedication to providing high-quality products that will reduce costs in the oncology space."

Hospira will initially offer oxaliplatin injection in 50 mg and 100 mg single-use vials.

Hospira's specialty injectable pharmaceuticals (SIP) offering includes approximately 200 generic injectable drugs in many dosages and formulations. In addition, many of its products are available in popular differentiated formats, several of which are proprietary, such as its ADD-Vantage(R) drug delivery system and iSecure(R) prefilled syringes. Therapeutic areas include anesthesia, anti-infectives, analgesics, cardiovascular, oncology, emergency and other areas. Hospira has approximately 25 generic drugs scheduled to launch in various regions around the world in 2009 and 2010.

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