Epigentek Group releases SuperSense Methylated DNA Quantification kit

Epigentek Group Inc. today announced that it released the SuperSense(TM) Methylated DNA Quantification Kit to complete its line of methylated DNA quantification products (http://www.epigentek.com/catalog/dna-methylation-quantification-c-21_48.html). The SuperSense(TM) kit fluorometrically measures global DNA methylation shifts. This new tool complements the company's flagship product and colorimetric version of quantifying methylated DNA, the Methylamp(TM) Global DNA Methylation Quantification Ultra Kit.

Global DNA hypomethylation is likely caused by methyl-deficiency due to a variety of environmental influences and has been proposed as a molecular marker in multiple biological processes such as cancer. It is well demonstrated that the decrease in global DNA methylation is one of the most important characteristics of cancer. Thus the quantification of global methylation in cancer cells provides very useful information for detection and analysis of this disease.

By offering a kit-based method for such quantification, Epigentek makes an improvement over conventional methods (i.e. mass spectrometry, enzymatic degradation and analysis, immunohistostaining), overcoming limitations such as the need for special equipment, long protocols, low sensitivity, and radioactivity.

The new SuperSense(TM) kit is a fluorescence-based assay that can be completed in 3 easy-to-follow steps within 2.5 hours via a convenient 96-well plate format. The kit is extremely sensitive with the detection limit as low as 50 pg of methylated DNA, suitable for quantifying methylated DNA using a very small amount of DNA samples.

Epigentek also simultaneously released a fluorometric version of its EpiQuik(TM) DNA Methyltransferase Activity/Inhibition Assay Kit.

SOURCE Epigentek Group Inc.

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