Apixaban superior to enoxaparin in reducing venous thromboembolism in total knee replacement surgery patients

Apixaban, an oral anticoagulant being developed by Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE: BMY) and Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE), was statistically superior to 40 mg once daily enoxaparin in reducing the incidence of venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing elective total knee replacement surgery, according to the ADVANCE-2 study results published today in The Lancet. The study results also showed numerically lower rates of major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding in patients treated with apixaban compared with those treated with enoxaparin. These results did not meet statistical significance.

“We are encouraged by the ADVANCE-2 data, which demonstrated better antithrombotic effect and comparable bleeding rates for apixaban compared with enoxaparin.”

Apixaban is a novel, oral, highly selective Factor Xa inhibitor, part of a class of agents being studied for their potential to prevent and treat blood clots in the veins and arteries. Results of ADVANCE-2 were first presented in July 2009 at the 22nd Congress of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis in Boston.

Patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery, including total knee replacement, are at high risk for venous thromboembolism. In fact, venous thromboembolism occurs in 40 to 60 percent of patients undergoing orthopedic surgery who do not receive preventive care. With an estimated 400,000 people worldwide undergoing total knee replacement surgery each year, the threat of venous thromboembolism and its associated morbidity and mortality risk represent a growing challenge to physicians.

“One of the major concerns for orthopedic surgeons using oral anticoagulants for venous thromboembolism prevention in knee surgery is the significant risk of bleeding,” said Michael Rud Lassen, M.D., Hoersholm Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark, lead investigator for the study. “We are encouraged by the ADVANCE-2 data, which demonstrated better antithrombotic effect and comparable bleeding rates for apixaban compared with enoxaparin.”

About Bristol-Myers Squibb

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
Post a new comment
Post

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.

You might also like...
Nose cartilage-based knee joint treatment project receives €2.3 million funding