RXi Pharmaceuticals to present advances in RNAi therapeutics at 3rd International Scar Club Meeting

RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation (Nasdaq: RXII), a biopharmaceutical company pursuing the development and commercialization of proprietary therapeutics based on RNA interference (RNAi), announced that Pamela Pavco, Ph.D., Vice President of Pharmaceutical Development, will be presenting at the 3rd International Scar Club Meeting in Montpellier, France on March 26, 2010. The presentation will not be webcast.

“We are very encouraged with the substantial progress we have made with our therapeutic platform, especially our proprietary sd-rxRNA™”

Dr. Pavco’s presentation describes new preclinical data exemplifying the performance of RXi’s proprietary self-delivering rxRNA (sd-rxRNA™) compounds in an in vivo model of compromised skin. Data generated using a fluorescently-tagged sd-rxRNA™ compound demonstrate spontaneous cellular uptake into dermal cells and a significant, sustained and reproducible silencing of the targeted mRNA. The data presented establish the efficacy of locally-administered sd-rxRNA™ in animal models and support the potential use of these novel compounds for clinical applications where direct or local administration is possible.

"We are very encouraged with the substantial progress we have made with our therapeutic platform, especially our proprietary sd-rxRNA™,” said Noah D. Beerman, President and Chief Executive Officer of RXi. “Delivery remains one of the most important objectives in our efforts to advance RNAi therapeutics into patients. Our demonstration that sd-rxRNA™ compounds efficiently enter cells in vivo and effect significant gene silencing without the need for an additional delivery vehicle is an important advancement for RXi in its progression toward the clinic.”

Source:

RXi Pharmaceuticals Corporation

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