Still River Systems announces clinical beam extraction from world's smallest high-energy proton therapy accelerator

Still River Systems, Inc. announces successful clinical beam extraction from the first production unit of the world's smallest high-energy proton therapy accelerator. Powerful proton beams are used for the precise treatment of cancer by delivering a highly focused beam of radiation to the tumor while reducing the damage to surrounding healthy tissue and vital organs. This unique accelerator, the world's first superconducting synchrocyclotron, has been specially designed for the Monarch250 Proton Therapy System currently being installed at the Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO, a National Cancer Institute (NCI) Comprehensive Cancer Center.  

Accelerators have been used in proton therapy for 60 years, but their size, complexity, and cost have limited adoption of this cancer therapy to a few centers around the world.   Still River Systems, based on technology developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Plasma Science Fusion Center, has now harnessed breakthroughs in superconducting technology to create the world's smallest high-energy proton therapy accelerator.  "The successful testing of our first production accelerator is the culmination of several years of development", explains Dr. Kenneth Gall, Founder and Chief Technology Officer. "We have used advanced superconducting technology and a unique synchrocyclotron design to build a modern accelerator optimized for proton therapy."  With a diameter of only 6 feet and a weight of 20 tons, this accelerator generates a powerful 250 MeV proton beam.

The Siteman Cancer Center will be the first in the world to receive this groundbreaking device.  "As a national leader in cancer treatment, we are excited we will be the first to offer this technology to our patients," says Richard Liekweg, Barnes-Jewish Hospital President. "Many patients choose an NCI designated center like ours because we're able to provide options like proton therapy and this streamlined system will allow us to provide the best treatment possibilities for each patient."

The Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and the University of Oklahoma Medical Center are two other centers that are currently constructing a proton therapy center to take delivery of Still River Systems revolutionary proton technology.  "Production of a compact proton accelerator is truly exciting and unique to the world of proton therapy and is a demonstration of our dedication to providing physicians and patients access to the highest standard of cancer care," stated Joseph Jachinowski, Still River Systems CEO. "We have built an exceptional proton therapy accelerator and are establishing a lean and solid production line with a strong organization to produce, deploy and service these accelerators worldwide."

Source:

Still River Systems, Inc.

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