Gilead presents Phase IIa data for HCV therapy at The Liver Meeting 2010

Gilead Sciences, Inc. (Nasdaq:GILD) today announced data from a Phase IIa study showing that its investigational compounds GS 9190 and GS 9256, used in conjunction with current standard of care therapies, produced substantial suppression of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) within 28 days of treatment. The findings are being presented Monday, November 1, during a latebreaker oral session (#LB-1) at the 61st annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (The Liver Meeting 2010) in Boston.

“The data presented today support the continued clinical evaluation of GS 9190 and GS 9256 in combination with other hepatitis C therapies and provide additional clinical insight into the effect of ribavirin in the absence of interferon.”

"Patients with chronic hepatitis C urgently need new and better treatment options, particularly combination therapies involving antiviral drugs that employ multiple mechanisms of action to eradicate the virus," said the study's principal investigator, Stefan Zeuzem, MD, JW Goethe University Hospital, Frankfurt, Germany. "The data presented today support the continued clinical evaluation of GS 9190 and GS 9256 in combination with other hepatitis C therapies and provide additional clinical insight into the effect of ribavirin in the absence of interferon."

More than seven million people in industrialized countries are chronically infected with HCV, and as many as three million Americans have the disease. The current standard of care in HCV therapy is the oral antiviral ribavirin (RBV), administered in combination with peg-interferon (Peg-IFN), which is delivered via injection and achieves a sustained therapeutic response in only 40-55 percent of patients with HCV genotype 1, the most common form of HCV in the Americas and Europe.

Gilead's three-arm Phase IIa trial (Study 196-0112) evaluated the safety and efficacy of GS 9190, an oral polymerase inhibitor, in combination with GS 9256, an oral protease inhibitor, when used as: 1) a dual antiviral therapy alone; 2) a three-drug regimen with RBV; or 3) a four-drug regimen with RBV and Peg-IFN. The study found that the all-oral regimen of GS 9190, GS 9256 and RBV produced substantial viral suppression, with a median maximal decline from baseline in HCV RNA of 5.1 log10 IU/mL during 28 days of treatment. Among patients given the four-drug regimen of GS 9190, GS 9256, RBV and Peg-IFN, 100 percent (14/14 patients) achieved Rapid Virologic Response (RVR) (HCV RNA < 25 IU/mL) at day 28, with 93 percent (13/14 patients) achieving undetectable viral levels (HCV RNA < 10 IU/mL). No virologic breakthroughs were observed in this arm.

"Oral combinations of multiple antiviral agents are expected to become the new standard of care for patients with hepatitis C, and our ultimate goal and vision is to develop a potent and well-tolerated fixed-dose combination product that will eliminate the need for peg-interferon," said John McHutchison, MD, Senior Vice President for Liver Disease Therapeutics at Gilead. "These data strongly support the clinical potential of this oral combination HCV therapy, and we're looking forward to advancing the development of GS 9190 and GS 9256."

Source:

Gilead Sciences, Inc.

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