New England publishes results of phase III clinical trial of ABRAXANE for metastatic pancreatic cancer

Celgene International Sàrl, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Celgene Corporation (NASDAQ:CELG), today announced the results of the MPACT (Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Clinical Trial) phase III clinical trial of ABRAXANE® (paclitaxel protein-bound particles for injectable suspension) (albumin-bound) in combination with gemcitabine were published online in the October 16th edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.

The MPACT study, chaired by lead author and study principal investigator, Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, Chief Scientific Officer for Scottsdale Healthcare's Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials and Physician-In-Chief for the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), is a Celgene-sponsored, open-label, randomized, study of 861 previously untreated patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer at 151 community and academic centers from 11 countries in North America, Eastern and Western Europe and Australia. The article, titled "Increased Survival in Pancreatic Cancer with nab-Paclitaxel plus Gemcitabine," is available online at http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1304369 for the citation Von Hoff DD, Ervin T, Arena FP, et al. Increased survival in pancreatic cancer with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine. N Engl J Med 2013. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1304369.

"The peer-reviewed publication of the MPACT results in the New England Journal of Medicine further validates the importance of this treatment regimen," said Markus Renschler, M.D., Corporate Vice President, Global Head of Hematology and Oncology Medical Affairs at Celgene Corporation. "These results led to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval of ABRAXANE for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, in combination with gemcitabine."

Source: Celgene International Sàrl

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