Case study from Intel and UCSD highlights health sciences research

A case study from Intel and UCSD highlights the transformative collaboration between the school's bioengineering department and the Intel® Internet of Things (IoT). As part of the Intel® Software Academic Program, UCSD's research focuses on exploring the intersection between computer sciences and the human body.

The study exhibits the work of Dr. Todd P. Coleman, Associate Professor of Bioengineering at UCSD who has worked with a unique combination of disciplines including Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Bioelectronics and medicine to identify ways in which smart devices can be more fully integrated into medical and mental health practices. The document describes one project that develops sensors: tiny, smart devices that can relay critical biorhythmic information such as heart rate and blood pressure to smart phones. The goal is for doctors to receive and communicate potentially life-saving information from remote locations.

Intel provides hardware, software and support to this ambitious project that also directly involves the community and K-12 education. The goal of the IoT is to improve societal infrastructure by nurturing technological progress at every level of education. The implications of this more holistic approach to mental and physical health are inspiring, fostering greater quality of life on a potentially global scale.

The Internet of Things:

Emerging end-to-end solutions for IoT will allow individuals, businesses, and governments to collect, analyze, and derive meaning from data in ways that improve people's lives and boost the bottom line for organizations. Helping to make this a reality, Intel's extensive portfolio of open and scalable solutions makes it easier to connect, protect, and manage devices. With expertise in systems across the entire IoT architecture – things, gateways, network and cloud, and services-creation and solutions layers – Intel is accelerating business transformation.

Source:

Intel Corporation

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