ADCETRIS drug receives approval in Japan as frontline treatment option for Hodgkin lymphoma

Seattle Genetics, Inc. today announced that its collaborator, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited (Takeda), has received approval from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for ADCETRIS (brentuximab vedotin) in combination with doxorubicin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (AVD) as a frontline treatment option for CD30-positive Hodgkin lymphoma patients in Japan. As a result, Seattle Genetics will receive a milestone payment from Takeda of $10 million. The approval in Japan was based on the positive outcome from the phase 3 ECHELON-1 trial.

"This approval marks another important milestone in expanding the ADCETRIS brand globally and redefining the way newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma patients are treated around the world," said Clay Siegall, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Seattle Genetics. "ADCETRIS is approved in 71 countries and generated global sales of approximately $640 million in 2017, underscoring its progress toward becoming the foundation of therapy for patients with CD30-expressing lymphomas."

Seattle Genetics and Takeda are jointly developing ADCETRIS. Under the terms of the collaboration agreement, Seattle Genetics has U.S. and Canadian commercialization rights and Takeda has rights to commercialize ADCETRIS in the rest of the world. Seattle Genetics and Takeda are funding joint development costs for ADCETRIS on a 50:50 basis, except in Japan where Takeda is solely responsible for development costs. Seattle Genetics is entitled to receive progress- and sales-dependent milestone payments. In addition, Seattle Genetics receives tiered double-digit royalties with percentages ranging from the mid-teens to mid-twenties based on net sales of ADCETRIS within Takeda's territories.

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