Using spices and culinary herbs to develop new natural product based medicines

Culinary herbs have been used to cure various ailments, such as fever and joint pain as well as aid in wound healing. With the advances in modern technology, it is possible to extract, identify and test different chemical components for their pharmaceutical properties in vitro and in vivo. These studies can also help pharmaceutical researchers develop new natural product based medicines for treating various diseases.

Science of Spices and Culinary Herbs is a compilation of current reviews on studies performed on herbs and spices commonly used in cooking. The series is essential reading for medicinal chemists, herbalists and biomedical researchers interested in the science of natural herbs and spices that are a common part of regional diets and folk medicine.

The first volume of this series brings detailed information about two well-known Asian spices: Turmeric and Saffron. Chapters cover information about the effect of Saffron on the respiratory system, and several reviews on the medicinal (anti-microbial, anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory) properties of turmeric and specifically, its most important natural constituent (curcumin).

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