The kids are not OK

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Julie Rovner KHN

Teen girls "are experiencing record high levels of violence, sadness, and suicide risk," according to a new survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2021, according to the survey, nearly 3 in 5 U.S. teen girls reported feeling "persistently sad or hopeless."

Meanwhile, a conservative judge in Texas has delayed his ruling in a case that could ban a key drug used in medication abortion. A group of anti-abortion doctors is suing to challenge the FDA's approval decades ago of the abortion pill mifepristone.

This week's panelists are Julie Rovner of KHN, Alice Miranda Ollstein of Politico, Joanne Kenen of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Politico, and Sandhya Raman of CQ Roll Call.

Panelists

Alice Miranda Ollstein Politico @AliceOllstein Read Alice's stories Joanne Kenen Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Politico @JoanneKenen Sandhya Raman CQ Roll Call @SandhyaWrites Read Sandhya's stories

Among the takeaways from this week's episode:

  • American teenagers reported record rates of sadness in 2021, with especially high levels of depression in girls and teens identifying as LGBTQ+, according to a startling CDC report. Sexual violence, mass shootings, cyberbullying, and climate change are among the intensifying problems plaguing young people.
  • New polling shows more Americans are dissatisfied with abortion policy than ever before, as a U.S. district court judge in Texas makes a last call for arguments on the fate of mifepristone. The case is undermining confidence in continued access to the drug, and many providers are discussing using only misoprostol for medication abortions. Misoprostol is used with mifepristone in the current two-drug regimen but is safe and effective, though slightly less so, when used on its own.
  • There are big holes in federal health privacy protections, and some companies that provide health care, like mental health services, exploit those loopholes to sell personal, identifying information about their customers. And this week, Republican Gov. Glenn Youngkin of Virginia blocked a state law that would have banned search warrants for data collected by menstrual tracking apps.
  • California plans to manufacture insulin, directly taking on high prices for the diabetes drug. While other states have expressed interest in following suit, it will likely be up to wealthy, populous California to prove the concept.

Plus, for "extra credit" the panelists suggest health policy stories they read this week that they think you should read, too:

Julie Rovner: NPR's "Is the Deadly Fungi Pandemic in 'The Last of Us' Actually Possible?" by Michaeleen Doucleff

Alice Ollstein: The New York Times' "Childbirth Is Deadlier for Black Families Even When They're Rich, Expansive Study Finds," by Claire Cain Miller, Sarah Kliff, and Larry Buchanan; interactive produced by Larry Buchanan and Shannon Lin

Joanne Kenen: NPR's "In Tennessee, a Medicaid Mix-Up Could Land You on a 'Most Wanted' List," by Blake Farmer

Sandhya Raman: Bloomberg Businessweek's "Zantac's Maker Kept Quiet About Cancer Risks for 40 Years," by Anna Edney, Susan Berfield, and Jef Feeley

Also mentioned in this week's podcast:

Credits

Francis Ying Audio producer
Emmarie Huetteman Editor

Kaiser Health NewsThis article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

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