Plant-based medication may be an effective therapy to help people quit vaping

Eleven million U.S. adults use e-cigarettes to vape nicotine, and about half of them say that they want to stop, but many have trouble doing so because nicotine is an addictive drug.

A plant-based medication called cytisinicline may be an effective therapy to help them stop vaping, according to the results of a new clinical trial co-led by an investigator from Massachusetts General Hospital, a founding member of the Mass General Brigham healthcare system. The trial's findings are published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

In the double-blind randomized clinical trial, 160 adults who vaped nicotine but did not currently smoke cigarettes were assigned to take either oral cytisinicline or placebo tablets for 12 weeks. All participants had weekly behavioral support to stop vaping.

At the end of treatment, participants receiving cytisinicline were more than twice as likely as those receiving placebo to have successfully abstained from vaping for weeks 9 to 12 (31.8% vs 15.1%, p=.04). The drug was well tolerated, with comparable rates of side effects between the groups. The study was conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital and 4 other sites.

No medication has been approved by the FDA for vaping cessation in the United States. Our study indicates that cytisinicline might be an option to fill this gap and help adult vapers to stop using e-cigarettes."

Nancy A. Rigotti, MD, lead author, director of Massachusetts General Hospital's Tobacco Research and Treatment Center and a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School

The team tested cytisinicline for vaping because the drug binds to nicotine receptors on brain cells. In their previous clinical trial, the research team found that cytisinicline helped people to quit smoking traditional cigarettes. They hypothesized that it might also help people to stop vaping nicotine. "The results of our study need to be confirmed in a larger trial with longer follow-up," said Rigotti, "but they are promising."

Source:
Journal reference:

Rigotti, N. A., et al. (2024). Cytisinicline for Vaping Cessation in Adults Using Nicotine E-Cigarettes: The ORCA-V1 Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Internal Medicine. doi.org/10.1001/jamainternmed.2024.1313.

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
Post a new comment
Post

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.

You might also like...
Breakthrough male contraceptive gel shows rapid results in clinical trial