West Nile Virus

West Nile virus is a potentially serious illness. Experts believe it is established as a seasonal epidemic in North America that flares up in the summer and continues into the fall. About one in 150 people infected with West Nile virus will develop severe illness. The severe symptoms can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis. These symptoms may last several weeks, and neurological effects may be permanent. Up to 20% of the people who become infected have symptoms such as fever, headache, body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph glands or a skin rash on the chest, stomach and back. Symptoms can last for as short as a few days, though even healthy people have become sick for several weeks. Approximately 80% of people who are infected with West Nile virus will not show any symptoms at all.
West Nile Virus

West Nile virus Encephalitis is a mosquito-borne viral disease, which can cause an inflammation of the brain and can be a serious, even fatal, illness.

Read More

Overview

Feature Articles

Latest West Nile Virus News and Research

The ongoing 2022 West Nile virus transmission season in Italy

The ongoing 2022 West Nile virus transmission season in Italy

Promising anti-cancer agent may also prevent SARS-CoV-2 from replication

Promising anti-cancer agent may also prevent SARS-CoV-2 from replication

The currently available evidence on viral-induced parkinsonism

The currently available evidence on viral-induced parkinsonism

Human landing catch method provides important insight into the complement of human-biting mosquitoes in a region with consistent West Nile virus epidemics

Human landing catch method provides important insight into the complement of human-biting mosquitoes in a region with consistent West Nile virus epidemics

Study reveals the unique and unconventional way mosquitoes process odors

Study reveals the unique and unconventional way mosquitoes process odors

Why is COVID-19 more severe in people older than 50?

Why is COVID-19 more severe in people older than 50?

Study assesses eight de novo genome assembly software tools on viral next-generation sequencing data

Study assesses eight de novo genome assembly software tools on viral next-generation sequencing data

Researchers gain unexpected insights into activation mechanism of flaviviruses

Researchers gain unexpected insights into activation mechanism of flaviviruses

Anticancer drug candidate that targets a human protein could be a pan-viral medication

Anticancer drug candidate that targets a human protein could be a pan-viral medication

Molecule in mosquito saliva can be a potential new target for halting deadly diseases

Molecule in mosquito saliva can be a potential new target for halting deadly diseases

The enigma of post-acute infection syndromes

The enigma of post-acute infection syndromes

Rural California hatches plan for engineered mosquitoes to battle stealthy predator

Rural California hatches plan for engineered mosquitoes to battle stealthy predator

New technology to make temporary genetic modifications tested in mosquitoes

New technology to make temporary genetic modifications tested in mosquitoes

Bats carry some of the most virulent, but not the most dangerous zoonotic viruses

Bats carry some of the most virulent, but not the most dangerous zoonotic viruses

Groundbreaking collaborative work defines the risk of SARS-CoV-2 variants on immune protection

Groundbreaking collaborative work defines the risk of SARS-CoV-2 variants on immune protection

Climate change may push the US toward the ‘goldilocks zone’ for West Nile virus

Climate change may push the US toward the ‘goldilocks zone’ for West Nile virus

Researcher wins three NIH grants to tackle mosquito-borne viruses

Researcher wins three NIH grants to tackle mosquito-borne viruses

ISU surveillance efforts uncover invasive mosquito species in three Iowa counties

ISU surveillance efforts uncover invasive mosquito species in three Iowa counties

Study shows SARS-CoV-2 can infect and replicate in human iPSC-derived neurons

Study shows SARS-CoV-2 can infect and replicate in human iPSC-derived neurons

Chlorophyll catabolite pheophorbide A shows potential against SARS-CoV-2

Chlorophyll catabolite pheophorbide A shows potential against SARS-CoV-2