Launch of thin needle syringe for multiple sclerosis treatment

Serono, announced today the launch of its new 29 gauge-needle pre-filled syringe of Rebif®, the thinnest needle in a ready to use pre-filled syringe for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

“The new Rebif® pre-filled syringe illustrates once again Serono’s commitment to improving patients’ quality of life,” said Franck Latrille, Serono’s Senior Executive Vice President Global Product Development. “Having Rebif® in a ready to use pre-filled syringe with such a thin needle will make its subcutaneous administration easier for patients. In addition to improving patients’ quality of life, easy administration is a key factor in ensuring a good compliance to treatment.”

A study conducted in Denmark showed that 86% of Rebif®-treated patients found that injections were easier and less painful using the new needle. The pre-filled syringe of Rebif® with the new needle is available in the same dosages as the previous version and will continue to carry the same indication. It is currently being launched in Europe and will be available worldwide by the end of 2004.

About Rebif®

Rebif® (interferon beta-1a) is a disease-modifying drug used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis and is similar to the interferon beta protein produced by the human body. Interferon helps modulate the body’s immune system, fight disease and reduce inflammation.
Rebif®, which was approved in Europe in 1998 and in the US in 2002, is registered in more than 80 countries worldwide. In the United States, Rebif® is co-promoted by Serono and Pfizer Inc.

About multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory condition of the nervous system and is the most common, non-traumatic, neurological disease in young adults. Multiple sclerosis may affect approximately two million people worldwide. While symptoms can vary, the most common symptoms of multiple sclerosis include blurred vision, numbness or tingling in the limbs and problems with strength and coordination. The relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis are the most common.

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