Antimicrobial alginate dressing protects the wound with silver

Johnson & Johnson Wound Management today announced the introduction of SILVERCEL™ antimicrobial alginate dressing, providing the protection of silver and the absorption of alginate.

SILVERCEL™ dressing adds to the growing line of active wound dressings offered by Johnson & Johnson Wound Management. Advanced dressings have been developed to aid in the healing of chronic, hard-to-heal wounds that may be infected as a result of a high bacterial count.

The new dressing combines the potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial action of silver with enhanced exudate management properties of alginate technology. Because of a sustained release of silver ions, the dressing acts as an effective barrier and may help reduce infection. Antimicrobial properties are built-in through the use of X-STATIC® Silver Fibers. SILVERCEL™ dressing has been proven effective in vitro against 150 clinically isolated microorganisms, including antibiotic-resistant strains.1

The reported incidence of chronic wounds is growing due to the advancing age of the population and improved diagnosis. Each year more than five million Americans will suffer from chronic wounds caused by diabetes, circulatory problems or many other conditions. Infection at the wound site is a significant complication of the wound repair process.2

As a primary dressing, the new SILVERCEL™ dressing is an effective barrier to bacterial penetration. This barrier function may help reduce infection in moderate to heavily exuding partial- and full-thickness wounds including: pressure ulcers; venous ulcers; diabetic ulcers; donor sites; and traumatic and surgical wounds.

SILVERCEL™ dressing should not be used on third-degree burns or on patients with known sensitivity to alginates or silver. It should not be used to control bleeding. For more information, visit www.advancedwoundcare.com.

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