SwitchGear Genomics introduces GoClone miRNA research tool

SwitchGear Genomics, Inc., a leading provider of products for studying regulatory elements in the human genome, today announced the launch of a unique research tool for screening for miRNA function in living cells. The new SwitchGear GoClone™ miRNA target sets utilize experimentally-validated luciferase reporter vectors to accurately quantify human 3'UTR activity in response to a number of relevant miRNAs.

“We identified several novel targets for this miRNA which is an important regulator of normal and pathological processes in the liver.”

"The SwitchGear GoClone™ validated miRNA targets were initially identified using published data and prediction algorithms. The final selection of 3'UTR luciferase constructs were co-transfected with miRNA mimics to assess which 3'UTR targets showed the strongest responses," said Nathan Trinklein, Ph.D., co-founder and CEO of SwitchGear Genomics, Inc. "We are offering unique miRNA target biomarkers to allow researchers to effectively screen for miRNA function in response to any experimental condition."

SwitchGear offers the following GoClone™ validated miRNA targets for screening applications for the following miRNAs: mir-21, mir-29a, let-7a, mir-122, mir-124, mir-155, mir-200a, mir-208a, and mir-223. These miRNAs play a range of roles in regulating physiological processes from cholesterol biosynthesis to stem cell differentiation to the regulation of tumorigenesis.

"We performed a screen of predicted miR-122 targets using our collection of 3'UTR luciferase reporters," said Patrick Collins, Ph.D., Director of Research and Development, "We identified several novel targets for this miRNA which is an important regulator of normal and pathological processes in the liver." In addition, Collins remarked that the GoClone™ validated miRNA target sets serve as an excellent starting point for researchers who are new to the field of miRNA studies.

Source:

 SwitchGear Genomics, Inc.

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
You might also like... ×
Adapting biological research and development to COVID-19