Whole grains in diet translate to multiple health benefits: says research

Whole grains in diet can protect an individual from heart diseases say the CSIRO Food Futures National Research Flagship scientists. According to Dr David Topping, the chef research scientist at CSIRO consumption of whole grains in cereal and breads can reduce the risk of several diseases like obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, some cancers. Legumes and grains could also prevent asthma, gum disease etc.

He said in a statement this Tuesday, “Published research shows eating two to four serves of wholegrain foods a day can reduce the risk of heart disease by as much as 40 per cent - equal to the effect of cholesterol lowering drugs…There's also consistent evidence that a diet rich in wholegrain foods could play a role in weight management, lowering blood pressure, reducing the risk of some cancers, and slowing or even stopping the progression of diabetes.” These diseases he said are the leading killers of the nation and incorporation of whole grains in diet could be “prevention, not cure” and “the preferred option”.

These comments come in the wake of a release of a research report by GoGrains, a food industry body that also found that Australians eat only about half of the daily recommended whole grains. The report also cites the various benefits from whole grains.

Dr. Topping urges the government and legislative bodies to encourage people to incorporate these in their diets. “All of this adds up to a very impressive body of evidence which helps to support our push as nutritionists but also as members of other bodies to encourage the government and health authorities to get them to encourage the population to eat more [grains],” he said.

Head of Go Grains Dr Michele Allan also says that this is an easy way of disease prevention. “You're looking at less medication, less visits to the doctor and also if you've got a calorie-controlled diet and an increase to four-plus serves of grains and legumes a day, you actually reduce weight over a period of time,” she said.

Dr. Ananya Mandal

Written by

Dr. Ananya Mandal

Dr. Ananya Mandal is a doctor by profession, lecturer by vocation and a medical writer by passion. She specialized in Clinical Pharmacology after her bachelor's (MBBS). For her, health communication is not just writing complicated reviews for professionals but making medical knowledge understandable and available to the general public as well.

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