MaxCyte STX Scalable Transfection System acquired by CCS Cell Culture Service

MaxCyte, Inc., the pioneer in scalable, high performance cell loading systems, is pleased to announce that CCS Cell Culture Service GmbH has acquired the MaxCyte® STX™ Scalable Transfection System to develop and optimize cells for the pharmaceutical industry.

“The MaxCyte STX represents a fast, simple, and scalable way to transfect cell lines, primary cells, and stem cells with high efficiency and performance for cell-based assays for screening ion channels, GPCRs, and other targets”

"The MaxCyte STX represents a fast, simple, and scalable way to transfect cell lines, primary cells, and stem cells with high efficiency and performance for cell-based assays for screening ion channels, GPCRs, and other targets," says Dr. Oliver Klotzsche, Managing Director and co-founder of CCS. "The MaxCyte STX will help CCS expand its catalogue of cell-based products to pharmaceutical companies involved in drug discovery. By producing specific and customized cells faster and with higher efficiency, we can help our customers achieve their goals to develop assays and screen their compound libraries faster, resulting in more opportunities to find successful drug candidates."

"MaxCyte is very pleased that CCS has acquired the MaxCyte STX to expand the range of cells that it can provide for drug discovery," states Douglas Doerfler, President and CEO at MaxCyte. "CCS is known around the world for providing high quality cell-based products to the pharmaceutical industry. Adding the MaxCyte STX to its production capabilities, CCS will enable its pharmaceutical customers to develop more physiologically relevant assays that seamlessly scale up to high throughput screening volumes, saving time and improving the effectiveness of drug discovery programs."

Source:

MaxCyte

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