Sigma introduces CompoZr Targeted Integration Kit – mRosa26

Sigma Life Science, the innovative biological products and services research business of Sigma-Aldrich Corporation (Nasdaq: SIAL) today announced the launch of CompoZr Targeted Integration Kit – mRosa26, which can precisely and rapidly integrate transgenes into the mouse genome at the Rosa26 safe harbor locus. This kit follows the introduction of the CompoZr Targeted Integration Kit – AAVS1, for transgene integration in the human genome. For additional information on both kits, visit sigma.com/targetedkit.

Traditional transgenic approaches rely on random integration of a transgene. This low efficiency approach results in multiple random integration events at off-target insertion sites, and often requires the use of antibiotic selection strategies. In addition, the integration event can involve multiple copies of the transgene. Using the CompoZr ZFN technology, a single copy of a transgene can be targeted and inserted in the Rosa26 locus, which is a well-defined safe harbor site in the mouse genome. Sigma's CompoZr Targeted Integration Kits use zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) for precise and heritable gene knockin at the target locus (Rosa26 or AAVS1). Both Human and Mouse kits are supplied with the necessary ZFNs and donor plasmid to successfully perform transgene integration by ZFN-assisted homologous recombination, reducing the timescale and complexity of engineering transgenic mouse and human cell lines.

"ZFN mediated transgene integration using Sigma's CompoZr Targeted Integration Kit – mRosa26 represents the most efficient method for targeted transgene integration at the highly characterized Rosa26 locus of the mouse genome," said Dr. Supriya Shivakumar, Global Commercial Marketing Manager for Functional Genomics at Sigma Life Science. "This latest release is part of Sigma's ongoing objective to increase the research community's access to advanced genomic engineering strategies by offering innovative, easy-to-use products based on our proprietary zinc finger nuclease technology."

Source:

Sigma-Aldrich

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