InSightec completes enrollment in ExAblate Neuro clinical study for Essential Tremor

InSightec Ltd, the global leader in MR guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) therapy, announced today that it has completed enrollment in the world's first feasibility study evaluating the use of MRgFUS for treatment of Essential Tremor, using ExAblate® Neuro at University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia.

Fifteen patients underwent a non-invasive ExAblate treatment to evaluate safety and initial effectiveness of this investigational device. Most patients, who suffered for at least 10 years, experienced tremor improvement and no severe adverse events. They are being followed up for three months. Patient videos can be viewed here: http://bit.ly/sRpXno, http://bit.ly/tWaOl3

ExAblate Neuro, pioneered by InSightec, combines high intensity focused ultrasound for deep accurate lesioning of the brain, with continuous realtime MR guidance for visualizing brain anatomy, planning and monitoring treatment and outcome. The lesioning is performed through an intact skull with no incisions or ionizing radiation.

Additional research using MRgFUS for chronic neuropathic pain,targeted drug delivery, and sonothrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke is described in the January issue of Neurosurgical Focus devoted to MR guided focused ultrasound applications for central nervous system disorders.

"The safety profile of ExAblate Neuro and initial clinical efficacy are extremely encouraging" said Dr. Jeff Elias, principal investigator, Director of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery and Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery and Neurology, UVA. Dr. Elias presented interim results at the European MRgFUS symposium in Rome (http://bit.ly/sVntp3) and at the Congress of Neurological Surgery in Wash DC.

Source:

InSightec Ltd

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