New MU research finds link between trouble sleeping and behavioral problems in autistic children

NewsGuard 100/100 Score

New research from the University of Missouri has found associations between trouble sleeping and behavioral problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

"Past research has found that children with ASD often have trouble sleeping at night. Many children with ASD also struggle with regulating their behavior during the day," said Micah Mazurek, assistant professor of health psychology in the MU School of Health Professions and the Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders and co-author of the study. "Research on children without ASD has found that lack of sleep can contribute to these behavioral problems. In this study, we were specifically interested in whether sleep is related to challenging behavior in children with ASD."

To study the connection between sleep and behavioral problems Mazurek and co-author Kristin Sohl surveyed parents of 81 children with ASD. They examined common sleep problems including trouble falling asleep, trouble staying asleep and other specific sleep issues. They then examined whether these problems were related to common behavioral problems in children with ASD, including aggression, irritability, inattention and hyperactivity.

Through the analysis, Mazurek and Sohl found that sleep difficulties are highly related to daytime behavioral problems. Children who weren't sleeping well had greater problems with aggression, irritability and paying attention during the day. They found that children who awakened frequently throughout the night had the most trouble regulating their behavior. The research on sleep and behavior in children with ASD is ongoing, and future research will examine what may be causing these difficulties and which treatments may work best. In the meantime, they encourage parents to talk to their doctors about their children's sleep.

"If parents are noticing that their children are having behavioral problems, it may be helpful to make sure they are sleeping well at night," Mazurek recommended. "For all children with ASD, it is important that parents and professionals routinely screen for sleep problems. Addressing these issues will help children be at their best during the day."

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
Post a new comment
Post

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.

You might also like...
Single measles jab up to 2.6 times more likely to be ineffective in C-section born children