New refractive index detector with a very wide dynamic range from KNAUER

At Analytica 2016, the trade show for the laboratory field taking place in Munich from May 10th to 13th, KNAUER will be introducing a newly developed refractive index (RI) detector with most up-to-date features.

AZURA_RID2.1_vr_3000x

The AZURA RID 2.1L is a sensitive and competitively priced differential refractometer suitable for detecting compounds with little or no UV activity such as alcohols, sugars, lipids or polymers. This instrument is designed for use in analytical HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) as well as for GPC (gel permeation chromatography) applications.

The intelligently designed optical unit with advanced temperature control ensures high sensitivity, fast baseline stabilization, and excellent reproducibility. Furthermore, the long-life LED, highly pressure resistant flow cell, improved safety features and enhanced diagnostics functions guarantee easy handling and minimal maintenance.

The wide linear dynamic range of up to 2000 µRIU and its maximum flow rate of 10 ml/min, make the AZURA RID 2.1L the perfect choice for most LC tasks.

This detector can be controlled with OpenLAB® EZChrom, ClarityChrom®, Chromeleon® and PurityChrom® Bio software, as well as from the AZURA Mobile Control app (stand-alone operation). Control is possible via LAN or through analog input/output, allowing this RI detector to be integrated into almost any LC system.

About Knauer

KNAUER Wissenschaftliche Geräte GmbH is the full name of owner-managed middle-sized company that has been developing, manufacturing and distributing laboratory instruments around the world since 1962. With more than 100 employees they are one of the well-established manufacturers of HPLC instruments, SMB systems, and osmometers.

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