Incyte announces Phase 2 FIGHT-202 trial data in patients with cholangiocarcinoma

Incyte Corporation announces updated data from its ongoing Phase 2 FIGHT-202 trial evaluating pemigatinib (INCB54828), its selective fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor, in patients with advanced/metastatic or surgically unresectable cholangiocarcinoma (bile duct cancer) who failed at least one previous treatment. In patients with FGFR2 translocations who were followed for at least eight months, interim study results demonstrated an overall response rate (ORR) of 40 percent, the primary endpoint, and a median progression free survival (PFS) of 9.2 months, a key secondary endpoint.

These results are being presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2018 Congress in Munich, Germany in a poster presentation on Sunday, October 21 from 12:45 p.m. CEST to 1:45 p.m. CEST (6:45 a.m. ET to 7:45 a.m. ET). (Location: Hall A3 - Poster Area Networking Hub; Abstract #756P)

"We are pleased to share updated interim results from our ongoing FIGHT-202 trial at ESMO, which underscore the potential of pemigatinib as an effective new treatment option for patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma who have FGFR2 translocations," said Steven Stein, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, Incyte. "If the full data set warrant it, we look forward to submitting our new drug application to the FDA in 2019, seeking approval of pemigatinib as a first-in-class selective FGFR inhibitor to treat patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma, a devastating disease."

Cholangiocarcinoma is a cancer that arises from the cells within the bile ducts. It is often diagnosed late (stages III and IV) and the prognosis is poor. It is most common in those over 70 years old and is more common in men than women. FGFR2 fusion genes are drivers of the disease - occurring almost exclusively in patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA), a subset of the disease - and are found in up to 20 percent of iCCA patients. The incidence of cholangiocarcinoma with FGFR2 translocation is increasing and is currently estimated at 2,500-3,000 patients in the U.S., Europe and Japan.

Key Findings from FIGHT-202

Updated, longer-term follow-up data from the interim analysis presented today at ESMO (data cut as of July 24, 2018) show that in patients with advanced/metastatic or surgically unresectable iCCA with FGFR2 translocations treated with pemigatinib who had at least eight months of follow up (Cohort A, n=47), the combined overall response rate (ORR) was 40 percent, including 19 (40 percent) patients with confirmed partial responses and 21 (45 percent) patients with stable disease (SD). The combined disease control rate (DCR) was 85 percent (40/47). Additionally, median progression free survival (PFS) was 9.2 months and median overall survival (OS) was 15.8 months.

Pemigatinib was well-tolerated. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were hyperphosphatemia (61 percent), alopecia (42 percent), diarrhea (39 percent), decreased appetite (37 percent) and fatigue (36 percent). Grade ≥3 TEAEs (observed >5 percent of patients) were hypophosphatemia (14 percent), hyponatremia (8 percent), abdominal pain (7 percent) and arthralgia (7 percent). Five patients had TEAEs with a fatal outcome, none of which were related to study treatment.

"I am extremely encouraged by the interim results of the FIGHT-202 study, which demonstrated meaningful clinical activity and promising preliminary progression-free survival estimates, and, as a practicing clinician, I am excited about the potential of pemigatinib to provide a new treatment option for my patients suffering from the life-threatening nature of advanced cholangiocarcinoma," said Antoine Hollebecque, M.D., Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.

Source: https://investor.incyte.com/

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