March of Dimes implores legislators to vote in favor of hearing screen

NewsGuard 100/100 Score

The March of Dimes is making a House call -- House of Representatives that is. On February 21, 2008, the March of Dimes and volunteers from around the state will meet with legislators to discuss several issues, the most important of which is passage of House Bill 1177.

This measure would require the state of Georgia to administer a hearing screen to all newborn infants.

Hearing is one of the 29 identifiable and treatable "core" disorders recommended for screening by the March of Dimes and the American College of Medical Geneticists (ACMG). Georgia currently requires screening for 28 and does not include hearing.

"Currently, 32 states and the District of Columbia require universal newborn hearing screening," says March of Dimes Georgia Chapter's State Director Mark Gibson. "It is critical that the state of Georgia step up and join the majority of the nation by providing the highest quality of care for all of our infants."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that all babies be screened for hearing impairment before 1 month of age, preferably before they leave the hospital. Language and communication develop rapidly during the first two to three years of life, and undetected hearing impairment can lead to delays in developing these skills. Without newborn screening, children with hearing impairment usually are not diagnosed until 2 to 3 years of age.

House Bill 1177 is sponsored by Representative Judy Manning. In 2006, Representative Manning sponsored House Bill 1066, which expanded newborn screening to detect serious illnesses, severe disabilities, or potentially deadly genetic conditions that can be prevented if diagnosed and treated. House Bill 1066 was successfully passed in 2006.

In recent years, the March of Dimes has successfully lobbied for a reform to Georgia's health care system to require newborn screening. Screening is critical because it can identify disorders before symptoms arise and treatments can immediately begin. Lack of treatment can cause physical disabilities, mental retardation and even death. The goal of early hearing screening, diagnosis and treatment is to help children with hearing impairment develop language and academic skills equal to those of their peers. Most states have an Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program to help ensure that all babies are screened, and that infants who do not pass the screening receive the follow-up care they need.

Visit www.marchofdimes.com/nbs or www.marchofdimes.com/georgia for more information on newborn screening, including a list of the recommended 29 disorders.

The March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. With chapters nationwide and its premier event, March for Babies SM, the March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies. For the latest resources and information, visit marchofdimes.com or nacersano.org.

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
Post a new comment
Post

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.

You might also like...
Blood protein could be a potential biomarker for delayed concussion recovery in children