ITMTX treatment effective in late stages/progressive forms of MS: Study

Study shows ITMTX may have beneficial role in progressive forms of MS

The Multiple Sclerosis Research Center of New York (MSRCNY), together with the International Multiple Sclerosis Management Practice (IMSMP), today announced that results from its Intrathecal Methotrexate Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis study have been published in this month's issue of Journal of Neurology.  This study reports on the feasibility of using intrathecal methotrexate (ITMTX) in treatment unresponsive multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with progressive forms of the disease.

A retrospective, open-label, chart review analysis was conducted following patients with MS for up to eight treatments. Patients were considered for ITMTX treatment if they were unresponsive to or intolerant of FDA approved treatments. There was a one year follow-up after their eighth or last treatment.  Patients underwent neurological assessments and expanded disability status scale (EDSS) evaluations. In 87 secondary progressive MS patients, EDSS scores were stable or improved in 89%, with significantly improved mean EDSS post-treatment compared to baseline. Of 34 primary progressive patients, EDSS scores were stable in 82%, with no significant progression in EDSS post-treatment compared to baseline. ITMTX may have a beneficial role in progressive forms of MS and is well tolerated with no serious adverse events.

"We have opened an avenue of treatment for an otherwise untreatable form of MS," said Dr. Saud A. Sadiq, Director of the IMSMP/MSRCNY and the study's lead author.  "This is exciting news because it's the first time a treatment has been shown to be effective in the late stages/progressive forms of MS."

Source:

International Multiple Sclerosis Management Practice

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