HOYA, Adoptics partner to develop shape-changing accommodating intraocular lens

HOYA announced today that the Company has formed a strategic partnership with Adoptics (Switzerland) through an investment that will fund the development of a shape-changing accommodating intraocular lens (AIOL).

“This AIOL technology is based on a novel and clever concept that has the potential to produce a very powerful accommodative effect - something which remains the 'Holy Grail' of cataract and refractive surgery.”

Dr. David F. Chang, a clinical professor of ophthalmology at the University of California, San Francisco, commented, "This AIOL technology is based on a novel and clever concept that has the potential to produce a very powerful accommodative effect - something which remains the 'Holy Grail' of cataract and refractive surgery."

Commenting on the investment, Tom Dunlap, President and CEO of HOYA Surgical Optics, stated, "HOYA recognizes the significant impact that the proprietary AIOL technology will have in addressing both the presbyopic and myopic challenges of patients with cataracts. We believe the shape-changing AIOL is the most efficient and consistent way to provide the power range necessary for true accommodation and to achieve spectacle-free vision for many patients."

Adoptics' Founder and CEO, Dr. Khalid Mentak, stated, "This strategic partnership with HOYA will help us bring to market the first shape-changing accommodating IOL that closely mimics the mode of action of young crystalline lenses. Adoptics' technology uses a proprietary fluid-based refraction system within an IOL to create significant changes in the refractive power of the human visual system. Unlike other presbyopia-correcting IOLs, the Adoptics lens does not require movement of the optic within the eye to change refractive power. The refractive surface of the IOL itself changes shape in response to movement of the ciliary muscles, the natural process of accommodation in the human eye."

Source:

 HOYA Surgical Optics

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