IntraPace reports first commercial use of abiliti system in obese patients

IntraPace, Inc., announced today that the first commercial patients in Europe have successfully received the abiliti system as a treatment for obesity. The patients were treated at the Clinica La Luz in Madrid, Spain, and Stadtkrankenhaus Schwabach, Germany.

This new device is built on the same proven technology used in millions of cardiac pacemakers and defibrillators each year. By enhancing the sense of fullness that a patient feels when they eat or drink, the abiliti system aids the patient in reducing the volume of food ingested. In addition, the abiliti system uses food detection and activity sensors to automatically monitor a person's eating and exercise behavior. This information, which is critical to understanding patient behaviors and developing effective weight loss strategies, can be uploaded and viewed by the physician and patient.

"The abiliti System provides an innovative, patient-friendly option for people considering surgery to help control their weight. Successfully completing the first procedures with the product in Spain and Germany marks the beginning of our commercialization phase," noted Chuck Brynelsen, President & CEO of IntraPace. "Interest in the product is building in other EU countries and we anticipate first patients in the UK in the near future."

Following CE Mark in January 2011, the abiliti system is being commercialized via the following specialist obesity centers in Germany, Spain, the UK and Italy.

Germany

  • Stadtkrankenhaus Schwabach, Schwabach
  • Wolfart Klinik, Gräfelfing, Munich
  • Universitätsklinikum Wurzburg, Wurzburg
  • Chirurgische Klinik München-Bogenhausen, Munich

Spain

  • Clinica la Luz, Madrid

UK

  • Nuffield Heath Leeds
  • BMI Thornbury, Sheffield
  • BMI Albyn Hospital, Aberdeen
  • The National Obesity Surgery Centre, Sale
  • Spire Southampton Hospital

Italy

  • San Luca Ospedale, Torino
Source:

 IntraPace

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