Finland national health institute finds link between H1N1 flu vaccine and children's narcolepsy

"Finland's national health institute said on Thursday its latest research on previously found links between children's narcolepsy and GlaxoSmithKline's [GSK] Pandemrix vaccine against [H1N1] swine flu also involved a genetic risk factor," Reuters reports. In Finland, where 98 narcolepsy cases have been reported following the flu vaccinations, researchers found vaccinated children ages four to 19 "had a 12.7 times higher risk of experiencing narcolepsy than those who were not," the news agency notes (9/1).

GSK spokesperson Jennifer Armstrong said, "Further information from ongoing studies is still needed in order to gain additional insight into the cause of the reported cases of narcolepsy," according to CIDRAP News. "She said Glaxo is committed to patient safety and is working closely with the EMA [European Medicines Agency] and other regulatory groups," the news service writes (Schnirring, 9/1).


http://www.kaiserhealthnews.orgThis article was reprinted from kaiserhealthnews.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
Post a new comment
Post

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.

You might also like...
Trinity College Dublin researchers uncover key to enhancing MRSA vaccine efficacy