Researchers, advocates meet in Sydney to discuss state of microbicide, HIV prevention research

"Three decades after the full onset of the global HIV tragedy, science appears to finally be developing preventative measures, including microbicides that would thwart infections in the first place, according to individuals at" the biennial International Microbicides Conference in Sydney, the Asia Sentinel writes. "Now, however, the challenge is to put the solution into the hands of those most susceptible to the disease," the news service adds (Ramakant, 4/17). Researchers, advocates and funders met this week at the conference "to discuss the state of HIV prevention research," a conference press release states.

Speaking at the meeting, "Professor John Kaldor of the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales, co-chair of the conference, noted, 'This is the first microbicide conference to take place in the context of knowing a microbicide works and knowing [pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)] works,'" according to the press release. "Much of the research presented at the conference on Monday focused on the promise of PrEP, which involves HIV-negative people at risk for HIV using antiretroviral medications (ARVs) to reduce the risk of HIV infection," the press release notes, adding, "Other research presented at the conference on Monday looked at the biology of mucosal transmission of HIV and rectal microbicides" (4/17).


http://www.kaiserhealthnews.orgThis article was reprinted from kaiserhealthnews.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

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