Canadian physician wins AAO - Head and Neck Surgery Distinguished Service Award

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For only the second time in the history of the American Academy of Otolaryngology (AAO), a Canadian physician has won the AAO - Head and Neck Surgery Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Lorne Parnes is a Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology -Head and Neck Surgery and Clinical Neurological Sciences at Western University's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry. He is also the Medical/Surgical Director of the LHSC cochlear implant program, and site chief for the Department of Otolaryngology at the University Hospital site of London Health Sciences Centre in London, Ontario.

Dr. Parnes received his award at a ceremony held this week as part of the AAO 2012 Annual Meeting, held in Washington, DC.

The award is presented to medical professionals in recognition of extensive meritorious service through the presentation of instructional courses, scientific papers, participation on AAO committees, or in an Academy leadership position.

Dr. Parnes has published extensively and lectured internationally about the causes, mechanisms and various treatments of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and pioneered the posterior semicircular canal occlusion procedure for treating intractable BPPV. Dr. Parnes is also renowned for his work on direct drug delivery implementation in the treatment of various other inner ear diseases.

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