New data identifies specific cellular pathways by which RNS60 impacts Alzheimer's Disease

On Wednesday Revalesio Corporation presented new data at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference that identifies the specific cellular pathways by which Revalesio's lead investigational product, RNS60, impacts Alzheimer's Disease. This research, conducted in partnership with Rush University Medical Center, investigates a new category of therapeutics using Revalesio's novel nanotechnology platform.

Data presented at the conference demonstrated RNS60's ability to prevent memory loss and improve learning through the PI3k-pAKT pathway.  Additionally, RNS60 upregulates critical genes associated with neuronal plasticity. These genes play a key role in healthy neurotransmitter and synaptic function, foundational activities of the brain. 

Defining RNS60's activity against these genes is an important link between the significant therapeutic activity demonstrated by RNS60 in mouse and cellular models where RNS60 prevented beta-amyloid induced cell death and tau-neurofibrillary tangles – the most common hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease.

"The ability to define RNS60's biological activity to these plasticity associated genes and the PI3k-pAKT-CREB-BDNF pathway is an important event for the company," said Dr. Richard Watson, Revalesio's Chief Science Officer. "We have a large and expanding data set on RNS60's ability to reduce inflammation, and these findings are a significant advancement in our understanding of how RNS60 may be a treatment for neuro-degenerative diseases."

These plasticity associated genes and associated pathways have long been targets for drug developers, but Revalesio's approach through its charge-stabilized nanostructure technology provides a new paradigm for treating Alzheimer's disease. Revalesio and its research partners at Rush University Medical Center have submitted the data for publication. 

Source:

Revalesio Corporation

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