Phase IIb trial shows platinum-resistant ovarian patients treated with PM1183 live longer

Zeltia announces today that its pharmaceutical division PharmaMar has data from a group of 33 randomized patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer demonstrating that PM1183 shows a significantly superior median overall survival compared to topotecan. In this multicenter Phase IIb randomized trial, platinum-resistant ovarian patients treated with PM1183 lived longer, with a median overall survival of 18.1 months, compared to topotecan, which only achieves 8.5 months. PharmaMar will launch a pivotal Phase III trial to confirm the efficacy of PM1183 in a larger population, and that is expected to be the final step before registration of PM1183 for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

"The pivotal trial planned for next year will hopefully confirm the effects in survival that we observe in these patients, who are in need of drugs that will reduce the risk of death and extend their lives, without posing major side effects", says Arturo Soto, Director of Clinical Development, PharmaMar.

The Phase IIb trial consisted of a first stage, single arm approach to assess efficacy of PM1183 in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients, followed by a second stage, in which patients were randomized to be treated with PM01183 or topotecan as control group.

Results presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) earlier this year showed a significant improvement in the other secondary endpoint, progression-free survival, as well as in the overall response rate, which was the primary endpoint1. The results found now for the overall survival of patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer treated with PM1183 add to the clinical benefit, measured as 70% of overall responses and stable disease, previously observed. The manageable safety profile previously described for these patients has not changed.

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