Breastfeeding may protect mother against metabolic syndrome, study suggests

A new study shows that women who spend a longer time breastfeeding during their lifetimes may be able to lower their risk of metabolic syndrome and related disorders included elevated blood pressure, glucose, and triglyceride levels. Life-long breastfeeding of 12 months or longer was associated with a lower risk of metabolic syndrome, as reported in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website until March 16, 2017.

The article entitled "Association Between Duration of Breast Feeding and Metabolic Syndrome: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys" describes a study of more than 4,700 Korean women aged 19-50 years in which the risk of developing metabolic syndrome or its component disorders was assessed based on life-long duration of breastfeeding, divided into four groups: < 5 months, 6-11 months, 12-23 months, or > 24 months. Coauthors Se Rin Choi, Yong Min Kim, Min Su Cho, So Hyun Kim, and Young Suk Shim, Hallym University, College of Medicine (Seoul, Korea), report the duration of breastfeeding found to be associated with decreased risk of individual components of metabolic syndrome, such as blood pressure, blood glucose, and cholesterol.

"The advantageous effects of breastfeeding for newborns and babies are well established, and this study, which suggests that breastfeeding may protect the mother against metabolic syndrome, further adds to the evidence base supporting the benefits of breastfeeding for maternal health," says Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Women's Health, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health.

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
You might also like... ×
Proximity to natural environments benefits formula-fed babies' gut microbiome