Researchers develop 3D bioprinting technology for eliminating cancer cells

A three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting technology capable of eliminating cancer cells using the function of immune cells has been developed for the first time in the world.

Through joint research with the Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (President Sang Jin Park, hereinafter referred to as KIMM), the Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (President Jang Seong Kim, hereinafter referred to as KRIBB), institute under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Science and ICT, developed a 3D bioprinting technology using natural killer cells (NK cells) as a new method of immunotherapy for treating cancer, and announced the outcome of the research on Biomaterials Research (IF: 11. 3), a renowned journal.

Allowing the 3D-printed hydrogels to encapsulate NK cells helps to prevent the loss of NK cells and enables a majority of those cells to home in on the tumor cells. Pores form in the hydrogel, and NK cells that retain cell viability are released after a certain amount of time, which allows for the performance of immune functions.

Although NK cells are generally used for immunotherapy, the method of injecting NK cells via intravenous injection has not shown effective results in clinical trials on solid tumors*. This is because NK cells are incapable of retaining an appropriate level of viability and fail to target solid tumors.

On the other hand, by using the newly developed technology, NK cells can be injected into the hydrogel, printed, and then cultured in a 3D environment, which enhances the cell viability and activity of NK cells and enables those cells to confront cancer tissues.

Principal Researcher Su A Park of KIMM was quoted as saying, "This technology can help to significantly improve the functionality of NK cells that are used for cancer treatment. We expect to contribute to the treatment of cancer patients through this newly developed technology."

This research was carried out with the support of the project for the "Development of multiscale-vasculature-laden skin composite tissue for evaluation of implantable nano-bio-sensors" sponsored by the Ministry of Science and ICT and the National Research Foundation of Korea, and the project for the "development of UnTACT systems for critical illnesses" conducted by the Convergence Research Center of the National Research Council of Science and Technology.

The Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM) is a non-profit government-funded research institute under the Ministry of Science and ICT. Since its foundation in 1976, KIMM is contributing to economic growth of the nation by performing R&D on key technologies in machinery and materials, conducting reliability test evaluation, and commercializing the developed products and technologies.

This research was carried out with the support of the project for the "Development of multiscale-vasculature-laden skin composite tissue for evaluation of implantable nano-bio-sensors" sponsored by the Ministry of Science and ICT and the National Research Foundation of Korea, and the project for the "development of UnTACT systems for critical illnesses" conducted by the Convergence Research Center of the National Research Council of Science and Technology.

Source:
Journal reference:

Kim, D., et al. (2023) NK cells encapsulated in micro/macropore-forming hydrogels via 3D bioprinting for tumor immunotherapy. Biomaterials Research. doi.org/10.1186/s40824-023-00403-9.

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