T.S. Wiley to lecture on the latest advances in anti-aging medicine

Wiley Systems™, Inc. announces that internationally acclaimed Author T.S. Wiley will be lecturing at the second annual European Congress on Anti-Aging & Aesthetic Medicine (ECAAAM) at the Congress Centre, Mainz, near Frankfurt, October 15-17, 2009. Wiley will give two lectures among other international experts presenting the latest advances in anti-aging medicine. Wiley's topics include, "Predictive Modeling of Steroid Receptor Response," on Thursday, October 15 from 13:30-14:15, and "The Rhythm of Desire," focusing on rhythmic dosing in the treatment of male hormone deficiency on Friday, October 16 from 17:00-17:45 -- both in the Zagreb room.

Mainz has strong ties with the medical community, with a large medical student population and a University hospital with more than 50 specialized departments. This year's conference is in partnership with the European Society of Anti-Aging Medicine (ESAAM), the World Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine (WAAAM), and the American Academy of Anti-Aging (A4M).

"Men are remarkable, volatile creatures designed to live fast and die hard, and their testosterone can spike as much as 70 points in serum when they watch sports, a fight or see a pretty woman," said Wiley. "They're up...they're down, moment to moment, event to event. So, how could chronically, statically dosing their hormone replacement ever be able to restore them to that glory?" Once more Wiley goes where no regimen for replacing men's hormones has gone before... to rhythmic, youthful physiologic dosing of testosterone and DHEA for men.

Wiley continues, "A rhythmic dosing protocol for men can restore lust and love, risk-taking, sleep and muscle mass to fight depression and the inevitability of man breasts and snoring."

Source:

Wiley Systems, Inc.

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