Loma Linda University's Vision Intervention Program receives Spot screener from PediaVision

PediaVision today announced that Loma Linda University's Vision Intervention Program is the first in the State of California to receive the revolutionary new vision screener from PediaVision called "Spot."  The University's Department of Ophthalmology is offering free vision screenings to children from Riverside County, thanks to the support of First 5 Riverside, which invests in partnerships committed to improving physical health, social-emotional health, cognitive development, a stable home environment and schools.

Loma Linda University is planning on screening thousands of children to provide them with early intervention in order to foster proper visual development.  Spot will allow them to accomplish that goal by quickly and effectively screening children for indications of vision issues.  The screening results identify those in need of a complete vision exam from an eye care specialist.

On the Spot

Spot is a new breakthrough vision screening device that has an incredibly quick capture time of less than one second.  This unique capability makes it possible to screen numerous preschool age children from Riverside County during one school day, which dramatically lowers the cost to screen students.  The Wi-Fi enabled handheld device makes vision screening as easy as taking a photo and can be easily used by anyone when screening children from 6 months through adults.

Spot's touch screen interface clearly displays the results accurately and instantly.  Access to the screening data is immediate and Spot facilitates a large scale data analysis.  Thousands of children can be screened, and educators can instantly print reports, monitor follow-up care and show supporters the statistics behind childhood vision issues.

"Our goal is to give every child the opportunity to reach their full potential," said David Melnik, president and chief executive officer of PediaVision.  "Spot demonstrates how innovation can drive profound changes in communities around the country.  For the first time consistent and comprehensive vision screening is feasible on a global basis."

Vision Disability, Number One Health Issue

Nationwide, there is an on-going and urgent need for Spot.  The U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that vision disability is the single most prevalent disabling condition among children.  Approximately 80 percent of what children learn in their early school years is visual, so if they can't see a teacher's writing on the blackboard, they will struggle.

The current standard for vision screening is primarily based on subjective analysis from a chart invented 149 years ago.  In parallel, vision problems rise as children get older.  For children 6 to 11 years old, an estimated 21.5 percent have a vision problem.  Older students 12-17 years old are estimated at 24 percent.

In a recent study of the top seven health issues in schools, vision disability is priority number one.  This clearly shows evidence that addressing the prevalence of visions disorders can improve student outcomes.  Statistics show an incredible need, the CDC states that less than 15 percent of all preschool children receive an eye exam and fewer than 22 percent receive any type of vision screening.

Today, of all school-age children across America, 25 percent suffer from a vision problem, yet in the 9 to 15 year age group, only 10% of those needing glasses actually had them.

New Vision Screening Standard

PediaVision is committed to setting a new vision screening standard with Spot.  The technology was developed to detect vision disorders quickly, conveniently and affordably as possible.

In as long as it takes to snap a finger, Spot can identify the most common vision issues that affect learning in school-age children.  A quick screening is able to detect nearsightedness (myopia), blurred vision (astigmatism), farsightedness (hyperopia) and amblyopic conditions.  Amblyopia is the loss or lack of development of central vision in one eye that is unrelated to any eye health problem and is not correctable with lenses.  Amblyopia affects 1 in 50 children and must be identified at an early age in order to correct a child's vision.

Source:

PediaVision

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