NYUCN professor to investigate efficacy of Acu/Moxa in managing irritable bowel syndrome

New York University College of Nursing's (NYUCN) Joyce K. Anastasi, PhD, DrNP, FAAN, LAc., the Independence Foundation Endowed Professor and Founding Director of the Division of Special Studies in Symptom Management at NYUCN has been awarded a $2.5 million four-year National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant for the study of "Symptom management for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) constipation".

The primary aim of the study is to investigate the efficacy of Acupuncture/Moxibustion (Acu/Moxa) in reducing abdominal pain/discomfort and IBS secondary supporting symptoms such as intestinal gas, bloating, and stool consistency. The randomized, blinded, sham/placebo controlled study, with 183 adults diagnosed with IBS-Constipation, will follow the accepted standards of rigorous clinical trials.

"Acu/Moxa , used in traditional Chinese medicine, has been employed successfully to manage various GI disorders including IBS," said Dr. Anastasi. "However, few acupuncture studies have had the necessary rigor to evaluate this therapy," she said.

IBS is the most commonly identified functional bowel disorder afflicting 15% to 20% of North Americans. IBS is defined as abdominal pain/discomfort in the mid or lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract, associated with defecation or a change in bowel patterns with features of disordered defecation.

The chronic symptoms of IBS have been linked with decreased quality of life, decreased work productivity, and increased health care utilization. Few current therapies such as dietary modification, supplements, psychotherapy and pharmacologic agents are proven effective, either singly or in combination. Most [studies] said Dr. Anastasi, "have been limited by size, design and duration of follow-up."

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