The Atlantic examines 'paradigm shift' in global health response

"The world has an 'historic opportunity' to contain and end three of humanity's deadliest scourges by focusing on their 'hot zones,' according to Mark Dybul, the newly appointed director of the Geneva-based Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria," the Atlantic reports in an article examining a "paradigm shift" in the global health response. "Dybul said that a better understanding of the epidemiology of the diseases makes it clear there aren't what have been called 'generalized' epidemics, even in hard-hit countries, but there are what he called 'micro-epidemics,'" the magazine writes, noting the shift, "first modeled in the PEPFAR program ... also focuses on delivering measurable results, such as how much mortality has declined and how many new infections have been averted" (Andriote, 2/13).


http://www.kaiserhealthnews.orgThis article was reprinted from kaiserhealthnews.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

 

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