Clinical trial by Moffitt to reduce risk of prostate cancer in black men

Prostate cancer kills more African-American and black men than any other group. Yet, according to a new review published by Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, there is a significant lack of clear and consistent screening and early detection guidelines or prevention strategies. Their review concluded that focus on blacks is urgently needed in order to reduce their risk of developing or dying of prostate cancer.

"Much of the evidence we have today on how to prevent or treat this disease is based to a large extent on clinical trials with large numbers of European American men and not sufficient numbers of African-American or black men," emphasized study author Nagi B. Kumar, Ph.D., R.D., F.A.D.A., director of Cancer Chemoprevention at Moffitt. "Since recent studies have shown a biological difference in prostate tumors between African-Americans and European American men, research on prevention and treatment strategies that targets this high-risk group is urgently needed."

Researchers pointed out that clinical trials also need to investigate alternative screening methods and chemoprevention interventions targeted specifically for African-American and black men to reduce their risk. In their review, which appears in the August issue of Cancer Causes Control, researchers identified several promising drugs and natural compounds that based on differences in biology of prostate cancer may have a great impact in preventing prostate cancer in African-American populations.

With the lack of cancer research targeting this population in mind, Moffitt has launched a clinical trial using a botanical agent, isoflavones, on African-American and black men with prostate cancer. The trial is aimed at determining the safety, effectiveness and mechanism by which isoflavones can better reduce the risk of prostate cancer in African-American and black men.

Source:

Moffitt Cancer Center

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