Study finds link between fluoridated water and ADHD prevalence

"Artificial water fluoridation prevalence was significantly positively associated with ADHD prevalence," according to research published in Environmental Health (2/15), reports the Fluoride Action Network (FAN).

This is the first study to examine the relationship between exposure to fluoridated water and ADHD prevalence.

Artificial fluoride chemicals (hydrofluosilicic acid) added to public water supplies attempt to match the perceived decay-preventing effects of natural calcium fluoride. But teeth require calcium – not fluoride.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common childhood disorder. Symptoms include difficulty paying attention, controlling behavior, and hyperactivity.

Researchers, Malin and Till, conclude that, even after controlling for socio-economic-status, their findings suggest that fluoridated water may be an environmental risk factor for ADHD.

They write, fluoride "has received virtually no attention in the ADHD literature, [even though], there is a burgeoning body of human and animal research indirectly suggesting that it may contribute to the disorder's onset."

This ADHD/fluoride study comes on the heels of a British study linking fluoride to thyroid disease.

Malin and Till write "exposure to fluoridated water may contribute to ADHD via suppression of the thyroid gland."

Paul Connett, PhD, FAN Executive Director says "We've been falsely assured that the science is settled on fluoridation safety. But studies such as this one were never done before. What else have they failed to research? What's worse is that government agencies dismiss research that hurts fluoridation rather than protect the citizens whose health is entrusted to them."

Researchers Malin and Till explain that children and adults living in fluoridated communities (0.7 – 1.2 mg/L) actually received 0.9 – 3.6 mg/L and 0.6 – 6.6 mg/L of fluoride per day, respectively from all sources, including water, food and dental products.

They write "Fluoride can readily cross the placenta, accumulate in the infant brain and easily exert neurotoxic effects…Such changes can adversely affect arousal and attention, pain tolerance, and learning and memory, respectively."

"Importantly, among children who were exposed environmentally to water fluoridated at 1.2 – 3 mg/L (slightly above the US recommended level), increased urinary fluoride concentrations were associated with slower reaction time and poorer visuospatial organization that could interfere with attention, and reading and writing respectively," they write.

Connett adds, "With fluoride linked to lower IQ, and ADHD in children and hypothyroidism in adults, it is reckless to continue fluoridation."

Source:

Fluoride Action Network

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