Emmaus Life Sciences presents Phase 3 clinical trial of PGLG treatment for sickle cell disease

Oral Presentations at the 9th Annual Sickle Cell Disease Research and Educational Symposium and 38th National Sickle Cell Disease Scientific Meeting

Emmaus Life Sciences, Inc., a biopharmaceutical company dedicated primarily to the discovery, development and commercialization of innovative treatments and therapies for rare and orphan diseases today announced that data from the Company’s Phase 3 clinical trial of its pharmaceutical grade L-glutamine (PGLG) treatment for sickle cell anemia and sickle beta-0 thalassemia, will be presented, during the 9th Annual Sickle Cell Disease Research and Educational Symposium and 38th National Sickle Cell Disease Scientific Meeting. The conference is being held April 10-13, 2015 in Hollywood, FL at the Westin Diplomat.

“We look forward to sharing the positive safety and efficacy results of our Phase 3 trial of PGLG in treating sickle cell patients with leading experts in sickle cell research, treatment and advocacy,” said Dr. Niihara, president and CEO of Emmaus Medical.

The data from the prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multi-center clinical trial that enrolled 230 adult and pediatric patients as young as five years of age, across 31 U.S. sites will be presented.  Clinical benefits of the PGLG treatment, as reported in an abstract submitted to the Journal of Sickle Cell Disease and Hemoglobinopathies, include a reduction in the median frequency of sickle cell crisis, a lower median frequency of hospitalizations, a reduction in median cumulative hospital days, and fewer cases of acute chest syndrome, with a well-tolerated safety profile.

Oral Presentation Details:

Session Titles: Investigational Drug Symposium - Sunday, April 12, 2015

Plenary Session II - Monday, April 13, 2015 at 8:00 a.m. EST

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