Risk of hypoglycemia differs between SU agents, study reveals

NewsGuard 100/100 Score

Adding sulphonylureas (SUs) to metformin remains a commonly used strategy for treating type 2 diabetes, but individual SUs differ and may confer different risks of abnormally low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. SUs-which include newer generation agents such as gliclazide, glipizide, glimepiride, and glibenclamide-stimulate the production of insulin in the pancreas and increase the effectiveness of insulin in the body.

A new systematic review of randomized clinical trials lasting 12 to 52 weeks found that when added to metformin, gliclazide confers the lowest risk of hypoglycemia compared with glipizide, glimepiride, and glibenclamide..

"Risk of hypoglycemia with the SU agents makes the newer and more expensive antidiabetics preferable when metformin monotherapy fails. However, our data indicate that the risk of hypoglycemia differs between the SU agents," said Dr. Stig Ejdrup Andersen, co-author of the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology analysis. "Thus, prescribing an SU with low risk of hypoglycemia might still be a rational and affordable alternative to many patients with type 2 diabetes."

Source:

Comments

The opinions expressed here are the views of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of News Medical.
Post a new comment
Post

While we only use edited and approved content for Azthena answers, it may on occasions provide incorrect responses. Please confirm any data provided with the related suppliers or authors. We do not provide medical advice, if you search for medical information you must always consult a medical professional before acting on any information provided.

Your questions, but not your email details will be shared with OpenAI and retained for 30 days in accordance with their privacy principles.

Please do not ask questions that use sensitive or confidential information.

Read the full Terms & Conditions.

You might also like...
Restoring insulin sensitivity without TZD side effects