Video report reveals experiences of leading food hygiene lab in using Inlabtec Serial Diluter

Inlabtec has published a customer video report that describes the experiences of Swiss Quality Testing Services (SQTS) (Courtepin, Switzerland) in replacing traditional test tube based serial dilution with the Inlabtec Serial Diluter.

SQTS is a leading Swiss provider of  quality laboratory services for food  testing. Using state-of-the-art analytical methods, more than 80 experts offer comprehensive services for virtually all quality assurance issues from the conception phase to marketed products. SQTS examines the composition, authenticity and hygiene of food products and test samples for daily use - as well as testing goods for the home, garden and leisure segment.

At the beginning of 2015, after a period of evaluation, SQTS elected to replace using 9 ml test tubes for ISO 6887-1 serial dilution food hygiene testing with an Inlabtec Serial Diluter. Within a short period of time the Serial Diluter became an indispensable tool for sample preparation.

Today, staff at SQTS prepare food samples for microbial plate counts exclusively with three Inlabtec Serial Diluters. Lab staff on the video describe how they appreciate no longer having to prepare and clean serial dilution test tubes every day. They also comment on the ease of use, reliability and the automatic dilution of the samples, which reduces the handling steps compared to the test tube technique making the task much more pleasant.

The SQTS laboratory manager in the video commented that using the Inlabtec serial diluters has generated enormous savings in time giving him more flexibility in planning fluctuating sample workload and optimal use of staff.

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