The Chinese acute coronary syndrome drug market to grow from $326M in 2010 to $448M in 2015

Decision Resources, one of the world's leading research and advisory firms for pharmaceutical and healthcare issues, finds that the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) drug market in China will grow from $326 million in 2010 to $448 million in 2015. According to the Emerging Markets report, Acute Coronary Syndrome in China, AstraZeneca's Brilinta (ticagrelor) will exceed sales of Sanofi's Plavix (clopidogrel) in the treatment of ACS, making Brilinta the top Western brand in the ACS therapeutic market in China in 2015.

“Because the ACS drugs used in China are priced comparable to their average prices in the EU, the large patient pool in China greatly contributes to the market's size.”

According to the report, the success of Brilinta in China will be due to its efficacy, premium price and potential reimbursement coverage. Brilinta is expected to launch in China in 2012 and to be included on the next National Drug Reimbursement List, which should publish by 2014.

Meanwhile, market share of Sanofi's Plavix will decrease between 2010 and 2015 because of the adoption of more efficacious adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists Brilinta and Eli Lilly's Effient (prasugrel) following their launch, and the increasing use of generic clopidogrel.

"China's ACS drug market will surpass that of any of the major European markets in 2015," said Decision Resources Analyst Jing Wu, M.S., M.B.A. "Because the ACS drugs used in China are priced comparable to their average prices in the EU, the large patient pool in China greatly contributes to the market's size."

The new report features extensive primary research with Chinese cardiologists as well as a market outlook by drug and class through 2015 and acute coronary syndrome epidemiology through 2020.

Source:

 Decision Resources

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