Shire’s Xiidra receives FDA approval for treating dry eye disease in adult patients

Shire plc (LSE: SHP, NASDAQ: SHPG) announces that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Xiidra (lifitegrast ophthalmic solution) 5%, a twice-daily eye drop solution indicated for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease in adult patients. Xiidra is the only prescription eye drop indicated for the treatment of both signs and symptoms of this condition. Shire expects to launch Xiidra in the United States in the third quarter of 2016.

"The approval of Xiidra marks a new day in treatment options for patients with dry eye disease, with the only prescription eye drop approved in the U.S. specifically to treat both the signs and symptoms of the condition," said Flemming Ornskov, M.D., MPH, CEO, Shire. "As Shire's first FDA-approved medicine in ophthalmics, this significant milestone advances our goal of becoming the global leader in this category, where there are unmet patient needs. We have a robust ophthalmics pipeline, and we look forward to leveraging Xiidra as our entrée into the space as we continue to develop additional innovative eye care treatment options."

An estimated 16 million adults in the U.S. are diagnosed with dry eye disease. An often chronic ocular disease, dry eye is associated with inflammation that may eventually lead to damage to the surface of the eye. An eye care professional can diagnose dry eye disease based on signs and symptoms and determine management options, which could include the use of a prescription treatment.

"The clinical program supporting the approval of Xiidra is the largest for an investigational-stage dry eye disease candidate to date, including more than 2,500 patients," said Edward Holland, M.D., Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology, University of Cincinnati and a clinical trial investigator for Xiidra. "The clinical trial program design took into consideration many of the challenges of past dry eye research. It's exciting to see Xiidra as the first prescription eye drop FDA-approved for both the signs and symptoms of the condition."

Xiidra is a prescription eye drop solution used to treat the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease. It is dosed twice per day, approximately 12 hours apart, in each eye. The safety and efficacy of Xiidra was studied in 1,181 patients (of which 1,067 patients received lifitegrast 5%) in four placebo-controlled 12-week trials. Each of the four studies assessed the effect of Xiidra on both the signs and symptoms of dry eye disease at baseline, week two, six and 12. Assessment of symptoms was based on change from baseline in patient reported eye dryness score (EDS; 0-100 visual analogue scale). Assessment of signs was based on inferior corneal staining score (ICSS; 0-4 scale). In all four studies, a larger reduction in EDS was observed with Xiidra at six and 12 weeks. In two of the four studies, an improvement in EDS was seen with Xiidra at two weeks. At week 12, a larger reduction in ICSS favoring Xiidra was observed in three of the four studies. The most common adverse reactions reported in 5 to 25 percent of patients were instillation site irritation, altered taste sensation (dysgeusia) and reduced visual acuity.

"Dry eye is a common complaint to eye care professionals, with millions of U.S. adults experiencing the symptoms of this often chronic disease," said Kelly K. Nichols, O.D., MPH, Ph.D., FAAO, Dean of the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry. "It is critical for eye care professionals to have a dialogue with patients who report symptoms because dry eye can be a progressive ocular surface disease."

The inflammation associated with dry eye is thought to be primarily mediated by T-cells and associated cytokines. One effect of this process may be increased expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1); ICAM 1 may be overexpressed in corneal and conjunctival tissues in dry eye disease. Lifitegrast is a small-molecule integrin antagonist that binds to the integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a cell surface protein found on leukocytes, and blocks the interaction of LFA-1 with its cognate ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction can contribute to the formation of an immunological synapse resulting in T-cell activation and migration to target tissues. In vitro studies demonstrated that lifitegrast may inhibit T-cell adhesion to ICAM-1 in a human T-cell line and may inhibit secretion of inflammatory mediators (cytokines) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The exact mechanism of action of lifitegrast in dry eye disease is not known.

Source:

Shire plc

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